This is ATLAS.ONE (a high speed high resolution biochemical imaging platform)

Project ATLAS

In 2018, we decided to invest capital funds provided by the MRC and the MRC-DBT with the aim to make our technologies more accessible to the biomedical researcher laying down also the possibility to deliver advanced biophysical assays at high throughput [REF1] with a focus on 3D cultures. Why ATLAS? I often code-name internal projects, possibly with evocative names that might capture the pathos of the project. As these are capital investments to strengthen specific areas that will be essential for our long-term applications, I named this investment ATLAS, as the Titan that was condemned to hold up the heavens on its shoulders. In our case, I am building the base for two microscopes that will support my research projects, and support those of the others working at the MRC CU, in the longer period.

This is ATLAS.ONE

Here, I will briefly introduce ATLAS.ONE, the first of the two microscopes we have started to develop. The aim is to develop high spatiotemporal and biochemical resolution with a imaging platform that could be readily accessible by a non-expert user. We are testing the solid-state FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) camera PCO.FLIM by PCO for video-rate biochemical read-out of genetically encoded probes or protein-protein interactions.  This is the commercial incarnation of part of my PhD work [REF2REF3] so brilliantly developed and delivered by PCO (no commercial conflict). After considering different possibilities to gain some resolution to better discriminate cellular compartments, we decided to integrate this platform with a simple SIM (structured illumination microscopy) setup based on LCoS spatial light modulators. Biochemical perturbations will be implemented with a CellASICS microfluidic platform. This is a capital investment and we will first focus on methodological advancements, however, we will deploy this platform to characterize genetic and non-genetic heterogeneity in cancer cell lines. While we will look for external funding, we’ll start working on KRAS-dependent signalling pathways and metabolic pathways.

20190110_095745

Who is involved?

You are welcome to get in touch if you wished to coordinate developments or to use this platform – once established – either with own resources or common grant applications. Currently, ATLAS.ONE is supported by the MRC and the MRC-DBT for capital funds and the following people for development and applications.

Andrew Trinh and Alessandro Esposito (MRC Cancer Unit), developing the system and applications together with Christian Frezza and Annie Howitt (MRC Cancer Unit), developing single-cell metabolic assays.

Guy Hagen, University of Colorado, to collaboratively develop SIM

Gerhard Holst, PCO to advise on camera integration.

 

Author: Alessandro

Please visit my website to know more about me and my research http://www.quantitative-microscopy.org

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